ToF CMOS image sensor targets 3D vision systems

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Teledyne e2v, a Teledyne Technologies company, has released its Hydra3D time-of-flight (ToF) CMOS image sensor for 3D detection and distance measurement, supporting the latest industrial applications such as vision-guided robotics and automated guided vehicles. The sensor, designed with Teledyne e2v’s proprietary CMOS technology, can be operated in real time at short-, mid- and long-range distances, in both indoor and outdoor conditions.

The ToF sensor’s flexible configuration allows for trade-offs between specs such as distance range, object reflectivity, and frame rate. Thanks to its high resolution and flexible configuration, with on-chip HDR, the Hydra3D ToF CMOS image sensor can be used in outdoor applications such as surveillance, ITS, building construction, and drones.

The sensor features an 832 x 600 pixel resolution and fast transfer times starting at 20 ns, along with excellent demodulation contrast and sensitivity, according to the company.

The ToF CMOS image sensor features a 10 µm three-tap cutting-edge pixel, which delivers 3D detection of fast-moving scenes and real-time decisions so there is no motion blur and a depth map of over 30 fps. It also offers a large field-of-view scene in both 2D and 3D.


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An evaluation kit (Hydra3D EK) is available for multiple application setups. The kit includes a compact 2/3-inch optical format calibrated module, which includes a light source for near infrared illumination and an optic. Two versions will be available, targeted at performing the ToF principle at short-range distances (up to 5 meters) or mid-range distances (up to 10 meters) and with a field-of-view of 60° x 45° or a field of view of 40° x 30°, while capturing real-time 3D information at a full resolution. The company also offers several proprietary modelling tools.

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