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New interface to control electronic devices with your teeth

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TeethTap is a new interface to control electronic devices by clicking your teeth together. Fortunately, it doesn’t go in your mouth. Unfortunately, it’s probably terrible for my TMJ. Detailed in a new technical paper by researchers at Cornell’s Smart Computer Interfaces for Future Interactions (SciFi) Lab, the 3D printed earpiece pushes “against the jawline just under the ear and secures the microphones to the temporal bone behind the ear.” Evan Ackerman writes in IEEE Spectrum:

During extended testing, TeethTap managed to work (more or less) while study participants were in the middle of talking with one the researchers, writing on a paper while talking, walking or running around the lab, and even while they were eating or drinking, which is pretty remarkable. The system is tuned so that you’re much more likely to get a false negative over a false positive, and the researchers are already working on optimization strategies to improve accuracy, especially if you’re using the system while moving. 

Cornell SciFi Lab

Global microchip shortage could last two years

Microchips are used in more than just computers. As more devices have become digitized, from toothbrushes to tumble dryers, the demand for semiconductor chips has continued to increase. > > Read more trending newsThe increase in demand, coupled with production limitations and a trade war, has created a shortage of the chips that could last two years.At the start of the coronavirus pandemic, suppliers scaled back production, only to find that demand for electronic devices increase, especially as more students and employees were forced to attend classes or work from home.In addition, a series of freak incidents also impacted production, The Wall Street Journal reported. There was a plant fire in Japan; freezing weather throughout the southern U.S. that closed production facilities where chips are made; and a drought in Taiwan, where a majority of chips are made, is also a threat to production since a large volume of water is needed to make them. Then, as tensions between the U.S. and China grew, some companies stockpiled supply.“If you asked me, ‘what keeps me up at night?,’ right now is this supply chain crisis we’re having in the semiconductor industry,” Cristiano Amon, CEO of Qualcomm, the world’s largest mobile chipmaker, told CNET. “It is causing a lot of stress as the supply chain was not prepared to deal with the growth.”The microchip shortage first started to impact car makers earlier this year. Automakers reduced and canceled orders when the pandemic started, only to find scarce supply available when they needed them for production. In response to the scarcity, car manufacturers reduced employee hours and cut production of certain vehicles, CNET reported.Samsung said the shortage is impacting its appliance and television production, the Financial Times reported.“We are discussing with retailers and major channels about supply plans so that we are able to allocate the components to the products that have more urgency or higher priority in terms of supply,” Ben Suh, head of Samsung’s investor relations, said on a call with analysts last week.Tensions and restrictions between the U.S. and China prompted some companies to stockpile chips, the Wall Street Journal reported. Huawei, one of the world’s largest cellphone makers, uses chips in a range of products, and accumulated supply in anticipation of U.S. export restrictions.“Now (Chinese companies) are stockpiling for one month, three months, or even six months, and they have disrupted the whole system,” Eric Xu, deputy chairman of Huawei, told the Wall Street Journal.Electronics giant LG said it is “closely monitoring the situation, as no manufacturer can be free of the problem if it gets prolonged,” The Financial Times reported.The shortage could last two years, according to Pat Gelsinger, CEO of Intel, the largest chip maker in the U.S.“I think we have a couple of years until we catch up to this surging demand across every aspect of the business,” Gelsinger told CBS News. “COVID showed that the global supply chain of chips is fragile and unable to react quickly to changes in demand. One reason: fabs (fabrication facilities) are wildly expensive to build, furbish, and maintain.”The majority of microchip manufacturing, about 75%, is done in Asia, CBS News reported. In April, the White House announced plans to invest $50 billion in U.S. production of semiconductors as part of a $2.3 billion infrastructure plan, the Wall Street Journal reported.“This is a big, critical industry and we want more of it on American soil; the jobs that we want in America, the control of our long term technology future, and as we’ve also said, the disruptions in the supply chain,” Gelsinger said.

Making large-scale, functional, electronic textiles

RESEARCH SUMMARY

07 May 2021

Making large-scale, functional, electronic textiles

Large-area display textiles can be produced by weaving transparent conductive weft and luminescent warp fibres using an industrial rapier loom. The integration of interactive functionalities, such as a keyboard and power supply, with the display textile forms an electronic textile system that can serve as a communication tool.

Xiang Shi

0
,

Peining Chen

 ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0566-1660

1
&

Huisheng Peng

 ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2142-2945

2

Xiang Shi

State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

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Peining Chen

State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

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Huisheng Peng

State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

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This is a summary of Shi, X. et al. Large-area display textiles integrated with functional systems. Nature https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03295-8 (2021).

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doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-021-00945-9

References1.Rein, M. et al. Nature 560, 214–218 (2018).PubMedArticle
Google Scholar2.Weng, W., Chen, P. N., He, S. S., Sun, X. M. & Peng, H. S. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 55, 6140–6169 (2016).Article
Google Scholar3.Koo, J. H., Kim, D. C., Shim, H. J., Kim, T. H. & Kim, D. H. Adv. Funct. Mater. 28, 1801834 (2018).Article
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Exports spur Philippine foreign trade rebound

REUTERS
The country´s trade-in-goods deficit narrowed in March as exports grew at the fastest pace in a decade, the Philippine Statistics Authority reported on Friday.
Merchandise exports avanced by 31.6% to $6.68 billion after dropping by 1.5% in February, according to preliminary data.
The export tally for March was bigger than $5.35 billion a month earlier and $5.08 a year ago.
Meanwhile, merchandise imports expanded by 16.6% to $9.10 billion in March, higher than the 8.9% growth in the previous month.
March export growth was the fastest since 46.8% in September 2010, while import growth was the fastest since 26.2% in October 2018.
This brought the trade deficit to $2.41 billion in March, smaller than the $2.71-billion gap in February, as well as the $2.73-billion shortfall in March last year.  
Year to date, exports have increased by 7.6% to $17.56 billion compared with the Development Budget Coordination Committee’s (DBCC) projection of a 5% growth for the year.
Imports also have grown by 3.2% to $25.56 billion this year from $24.76 billion a year earlier. This was still below DBCC’s 8% target this year.
To date, the trade balance has hit an $8-billion deficit, narrower than last year’s deficit of $8.45 billion.
Ruben Carlo O. Asuncion, chief economist at UnionBank of the Philippines, Inc. traced the numbers to base effects.
“The reopening of the economy in these first months of 2021 was also a clear factor as more people were out and businesses were open for more economic activity,” he said in an e-mail. “Corporate demand for imports and other inputs was also observed during this first quarter,”
Nicholas Antonio T. Mapa, a senior economist atING Bank N.V. Manila, cited the “strong showing” of the mainstay electronics sector in driving export growth this year.
“Demand for electronics and subcomponents will likely remain high given the global chip shortage — a development that could bode well for this sector in the coming months,” he said.
Danilo C. Lachica, president of the Semiconductor and Electronics Industries in the Philippines, Inc. said global demand for electronic products has continued to increase despite a global coronavirus pandemic.
“The electronics industry directly accounts for about 10% of the country’s gross domestic product,” he said  In an e-mail. “If we consider the secondary effects of the industry’s supply chain, the total impact is about 20% of our GDP.”
Electronic products, which made up more than half of total exports in March, increased by a quarter to $3.60 billion.  Semiconductors, which account for more than three-fourths of electronic products, also grew by 21.3% to $2.73 billion.
Manufactured goods, which include electronic products, rose by 36.3% year on year to $5.57 billion. These items made up 83.3% of total goods exported during the month.
“We expect the base effect-induced expansion for both exports and imports to continue in the coming months, with the Philippine economy relatively more open in 2021 compared with last year,” Mr. Mapa said.
“Demand for electronics components given the global chip shortage may also help lift demand for the export sector,” he added.
UnionBank’s Mr. Asuncion said the state´s ability to hit export and import targets would depend on a bigger reopening of the economy, more fiscal stimulus spending and an efficient vaccination program.
He added that the March trade figures bode well for first-quarter economic performance, but it may not be enough to push growth.
The trade momentum would likely have been sustained in April, though imports probably softened after a tighter lockdown, Robert Dan J. Roces, chief economist at Security Bank Corp. said in an e-mail.
Rising imports after the economy is reopened would boost the trade deficit and likely lead to a weaker peso, he said. “We think that the government targets this year for exports and imports at 5% and 8% are attainable.” — Lourdes O. Pilar

Avalanche Technology and Falcon Electronics Announce Distribution Agreement for Space Grade …

FREMONT, Calif. (PRWEB)
May 07, 2021
Avalanche Technology, the leading developer of next-generation magneto-resistive random-access memory (MRAM) technology, announced today a distribution agreement with Falcon Electronics, a leading distributor of high reliability semiconductor and electronic components. Falcon will offer Avalanche’s memory solutions to its customers in North America, for Avionics and Space applications.
“We are pleased that Falcon Electronics has become the exclusive distributor for Avalanche’s Space Grade Products. Their heritage of servicing the Hi-Rel community since 1994, with excellent support and on time deliveries, makes them an ideal partner, as adoption of our technology has become widespread, and our customer base has expanded,” said Paul Chopelas, Senior Director of Business Development, Aerospace and Defense, at Avalanche Technology.
Avalanche’s space grade product portfolio comprises of serial and parallel interface Persistent S-RAM (P-SRAM) memory devices that are based on its latest Spin Transfer Torque Magneto-resistive RAM (STT-MRAM) technology. The serial interface space grade P-SRAM devices support Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) with single (54 MHz) data rate mode. These serial devices are available in 16Mb density, 3V and 1.8V supply voltage options, and in small footprint packages – 8-pin SOIC and 8-pad WSON. The parallel x16 space grade devices are available in 16Mb, 32Mb and 64Mb density options, and have asynchronous SRAM compatible 45ns/45ns read/write timings. All three density options in the parallel x16 space grade series are available in a small footprint 48-Ball FBGA (10mm x 10mm) package. Data is always non-volatile with 10^16 write cycles endurance and 10-year retention at 125°C in the space grade P-SRAM devices. The devices are offered in the -40°C to 125°C operating temperature range. Every device goes through a 48-hour burn-in before it is shipped to customers.
More information about the Avalanche Space Grade P-SRAM products is available at https://www.avalanche-technology.com/products/discrete-mram/aerospace/.
To order Avalanche Technology’s Space Grade P-SRAM products contact:
Derek Anderson
Director of Business Development
Falcon Electronics
(617) 784-9926
[email protected]
About Avalanche Technology
Avalanche Technology Inc. is the leader in next generation Perpendicular STT-MRAM technology, accepted as the front-runner to replace traditional Flash and SRAM for unified memory architectures in future SOC systems, delivering high performance and low power at 55, 40 and 28nm with scalability to 22 and 14nm. With a proven STT-MRAM portfolio at multiple geometry nodes combined with an intellectual property portfolio of over 300 patents and applications, Avalanche Technology is delivering on the promise of enabling the next generation of scalable embedded unified memory architecture for use in GPUs, MCUs, DSPs, ASSPs and ASICs, making it the true “Next Generation MRAM Company”. For more information, visit us online at https://www.avalanche-technology.com.

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Applied Materials Announces Q2 FY2021 Earnings Webcast

SANTA CLARA, Calif., May 07, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Applied Materials, Inc. will hold a webcast to discuss its second quarter of fiscal 2021 financial results on Thursday, May 20, 2021 at 4:30 p.m. ET / 1:30 p.m. PT. The live webcast will be accessible via the Applied Materials website at: https://ir.appliedmaterials.com. A replay will be available on the same day beginning at 8:00 p.m. ET / 5:00 p.m. PT. About Applied MaterialsApplied Materials, Inc. (Nasdaq: AMAT) is the leader in materials engineering solutions used to produce virtually every new chip and advanced display in the world. Our expertise in modifying materials at atomic levels and on an industrial scale enables customers to transform possibilities into reality. At Applied Materials, our innovations make possible the technology shaping the future. Learn more at www.appliedmaterials.com. Contact:Ricky Gradwohl (editorial/media) 408.235.4676Michael Sullivan (financial community) 408.986.7977

Article from: https://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2021/05/07/2225414/0/en/Applied-Materials-Announces-Q2-FY2021-Earnings-Webcast.html

How To Build Your Own Oxygen Concentrator

In this video, the presenter is constructing an Oxygen Concentrator. The concentrator can be made at home using the valve and tube to compress the air and with the help of zeolite the N2 is removed from the air to increase oxygen contraction. Courtesy: Han