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How Connectivity Trends are Changing Wearables and Mobile Devices

Date: Wednesday, December 18, 2019Time: 2:00 PM Eastern Standard TimeSponsor: Fischer Connectors and Kensington ElectronicsDuration: 30 Minutes
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Summary:
Faster data speed, smaller connectors and new designs are helping engineers create wearables and devices that couldn’t be imagined a few years ago.  Couple that with the capabilities of IoT, and you see connectivity trends driving innovation across several industries.  This webinar explores some of the new trends, especially for wearables, that will influence industry consumers as we move faster into the digital age.
Speakers:
David Ptacek, National Sales Manager, Fischer Connectors

David Ptacek is National Sales Manager for Fischer Connectors, working closely with customers to co-create rugged connectivity solutions that designed for a more connected world. He has over 30 years experience in the connector industry, and leads Fischer Connectors’ Blue Lab Innovation Team in the US.

Casey Donovan, Vice President, Kensington Electronics, Inc.

Casey Donovan is the Vice President at Kensington Electronics, Inc. Casey has extensive experience in the distribution field on both the sales and finance sides of the business. She also has several published articles regarding connectors and the design process for industries such as Military IoT, unmanned systems, and medical applications.
Bob Vavra, Senior Content Director, Machine Design and Hydraulics & Pneumatics

Bob had a long career in publishing, media and events. He earned his degree in mass communications, and then embarked on a 25-year newspaper career. After switching to trade publishing, Bob has covered the manufacturing sector for the past 16 years. He also has managed several global automation presentations. Bob also is a sought-after Webcast moderator and event emcee, and has presided over events in the U.S., Germany and China.

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What’s All This 3D Printing Stuff, Anyhow?

At the beginning of 2019, I purchased a Creality CR-10S S5 3D printer to make prototype parts for a motorcycle engine design I’ve been working on for decades (Fig. 1).

1. A redesigned Sportster motorcycle engine using parts from 1952-1984 era motors. Dubbed OSARM, for Open-Sport aftermarket replacement motor, I have worked on it for 20 years as an open-source design project.
Since the engine is almost two feet long, I needed a large printer, and the 500- × 500-mm working area of the Creality printer was one of the few inexpensive printers large enough to make my prototypes. Here’s a video of my impressions of the printer:
[embedded content]
In the video, I discussed the quality issues I had, the design problems of the printer, and my own ignorance and mistakes. While I did find some quality problems with the printer, I was amazed with the prototype engine cases I printed out (Fig. 2). I plan on having these machined out of aluminum, which will cost many thousands of dollars per part. The aluminum cost alone is about 500 dollars for a case-half. The cost of the 3D-printed plastic is 20 dollars.

2. A plastic prototype of the OSARM engine made with a cheap 3D printer can prove out the design before machining aluminum parts.
I designed the engine in SolidWorks, and CAD (computer-aided design) does help you see problems. Still, there’s nothing like holding a real part in your hand to see how it works and assembles to other parts. The 500- × 500-mm printer cost me about 900 dollars in 2018, lately selling for $720.
After working the bugs out and learning the principles of printing, my first project was to print a fixture for the transmission of my new design (Fig. 3). The design uses older Harley Sportster engine components, ranging in age from 1952 to 1984. The new case is my attempt to solve some systemic problems in the older design.

3. This transmission jig is also 3D-printed. It verifies the design before committing to much more expensive aluminum parts.
The Jig is Up
The new design requires a new shifting mechanism, so I can move the transmission closer to the crankshaft. This reduces engine length, and makes the primary chain shorter, obviating the need for a tension mechanism. When I printed out the small rotating shifter plate, I never expected it to fit into the holder I had printed, but it worked perfectly (Fig. 4).

4. The rotating circular plate that operates the shifter forks fits into its holder exactly. The right fork boss not being at the end of its slot reveals a design problem.
Being able to prove out the shifter jig, before making the parts in aluminum, gave me the feeling that the printer had already paid for itself. I found several problems and I can correct them before using the aluminum jig to make sure the new shifter mechanism works right. Companies like Protolabs offer painless computer-numerical-control (CNC) quoting, so that will be my first stop at making the jig out of aluminum. I’ve had good results using them for plastic molded prototypes, so I’m hoping their CNC service works out as well.
The results of the transmission jig encouraged me to print the engine case parts (Fig. 5). I learned about printing parameters as I went. To make a printed part, you take a solid model from a CAD package like SoildWorks and open it in the “slicer” program. This computer-aided-manufacturing (CAM) program generates the toolpaths for the 3D printer in G-code, similar to the G-code used by CNC machines. One popular and free slicer is Cura. Based on advice from a mechanical engineer friend, I paid $150 for Simplify3D, another popular slicer program. The fact that Simplfy3D stores both the model and the printer settings in the G-code has made me glad I paid for it.

5. Here, an OSARM case-half is being made in the Creality CR-10S S5 printer. The blue tape is truing the glass bed flat. The gray circle at the back of the part is a removable support structure for a hollow area below subsequent layers. The inside of the part is not printed solid, but rather, it’s a matrix called infill. To get the part to print in under four days, I set the infill at 10% in the Simplify3D slicer software.
There was all the usual suffering with software. SolidWorks had default stereolithography (STL) settings that were a bit course. I made the permissible deviation from true to less than 0.005 inches, and the .stl file size ballooned to 98 MB. Simplify3D would open this file, but it would hang when I set it up to make thicker outer shells for strength. I also wanted the thicker shells so I could tap several holes in order to bolt my mock-up engine together.
Creality Reality
The video I made details some of the travails I had getting good prints. The worst initial problem was that Creality shipped the printer with the Y-axis pulley slightly loose. This cause my first parts to have level shifting in the Y direction (Fig. 6). I went through a whole spool of plastic filament thinking the stepper motors were skipping from loads and accelerations before I realized I just needed to snug up the pulley setscrews.

6. A half-sized trial part of the transmission jig exhibits level shifting in the Y-axis. This was caused by a loose pulley.
Besides a few quality-control issues, the Creality did have a couple design shortcomings. While the bed is 500 × 500 mm, the heater under the bed is much smaller, about 300 mm square. You need the heater to get the bed up to 65°C or so, which makes the plastic filament stick to the glass bed. After the part is printed, the bed cools off and the part pops off. Full-sized bed heaters are available.
Another shortcoming is the need to level the bed before every print. I found I needed to first tram the X-axis extrusion to be level with the frame of the machine. Then there are four thumbscrews with spring mounts under the four corners of the bed. It’s critical to level the bed so that the first layer of plastic filament goes down uniformly. I initially had the gap too close, and it caused the filament to build up pressure until it squirted out in unsightly patches that interfered with subsequent layers (Fig. 7).

7. Two failed first-layer prints of the transmission jig. I had set the print nozzle too close to the bed. The plastic filament would build up pressure, and then squirt out in patches that propagated into large unsightly patches. That other areas of the first layer are almost transparent is an indication the spacing was too close.
One thing I did learn is that using the heated bed with the stock glass platen is the smart way to go. I tried tricks advocated on the internet, like thinned Elmer’s glue or glue sticks (Fig. 8), and the lack of control and consistency convinced me it was a losing proposition, I did not even try Aqua Net unscented hairspray, another trick advocated on the internet. My feeling there was that it was both an uncontrolled operation and that it would make a mess and get all over the moving parts of the machine.

8. I tried to cure warping problems by coating the bed with white glue diluted with water. The results were unsatisfactory, as was using glue sticks.
Just Do It
I encourage anyone interested in prototyping with 3D printing to just go out and buy a printer. I spent way too much time researching and theorizing. I thought I had to be a “cool guy” that had dual filament extruders for different colors or for water-soluble support material like PVA plastic. Turns out the support structures that Simplify3D auto-generates in the PLA plastic work just great. The zig-zag structures break off cleanly, even when they are inside horizontal holes in your parts. I also thought I wanted a direct extruder, instead of using a Bowden tube type. The Bowden type worked great; putting the stepper motor on the moving part of the X-axis only adds weight and mass to something you want to keep as light as possible.
I’m not new to 3D printing. I used a service called Forecast back in 2001 to make a STL case for a point-of-sale terminal I designed (Fig. 9). It allowed the startup I worked for to show angel investors real hardware. Companies like Protolabs and Stratasys also offer 3D printing that can be faster than you might do in-house.

9. These are two prototype SLA point-of-sale terminals made in 2001. Stereolithography gives better surface finish, and better strength, but the machines are too expensive to have at home.
When I was in my theoretical phase, I convinced myself that I had to send things out since I needed to do selective laser sintering (SLS) to make the parts. Since SLS melts the plastic with a laser from a bed of powdered plastic, you don’t need support structures in the part. You can just send the solid model to a proto shop, and although the surface finish is not very good, it comes back form-fit-and-function.
See, I theorized all this without every printing a part. Once I saw how good Simplify3D made support structures, I knew I could use cheaper simpler fused-filament (FF) printers, and I could do it in my office rather than sending it out.
Plastic vs. Metal
Now there’s a lot of hype about 3D printing being used for high-volume manufacturing. This is a sketchy proposition. The problem with 3D printing is that the plastic has much poorer properties than an injection-molded or machined plastic part. Just as bad, the time to make a single part is excessive. You are tying up a piece of capital equipment for a long time to make a single part. Contrast this with sheet metal. Sure, the steel dies will cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, but once you pay for the dies, you can stamp out a part every few seconds.
I worked at General Motors when they came out with the Pontiac Fiero. It was a plastic-bodied car, that unlike the Corvette, was meant for high-volume manufacturing. The first problem was that the parts were not as repeatable as sheet metal. So GM made a gigantic machine that would machine location points for the plastic panels on the car. Then they ran into that same cycle-time problem. You have to heat the die, then squirt in the plastic, and then cool the die with water jackets. It took over 30 seconds per panel.
So, you have one-million-dollar machine that makes two parts a minute, versus a stamping press that can make 30 parts a minute. Add to that the cost of the machine that trimmed the mounting points on the car, and you are tying up a lot of capital expense for revenue that does not come in nearly as fast.
There’s a lot of valid interest in printing metal parts, where you sinter the part after printing to give it properties as good or better than a machined part. This is a valid process, but it’s confined to high-value, low-volume production in aerospace right now. Until the cycle times come down, or the machines get as cheap as my Creality printer, there’s little chance the parts will be in consumer products.
There are 3D printer farms that have hundreds of printers working in parallel to get the production up. You can use cheaper consumer machines in those settings, but now you need lots of floor space. As a result, you have a sizable plant cost to go with the capital expense of all those printers. Don’t forget the labor to feed and care for the printers as well.
Cycle times are an interesting difference in molding plastics and metals. A metal die casting is a very fast, very high-pressure event. A mechanical engineer pal told me it’s almost as if the metal is exploding into the die. It will cool a lot faster as well, having better thermal conductivity. A plastic injection mold is a slower, more leisurely event. The plastic squeezes into the mold much more slowly, and you need a significant dwell time to let the plastic harden enough so that it does not warp when you eject it from the mold.
It’s all about cost—that’s the beauty of engineering versus science. What I have learned is that while high-volume manufacturing may not be applicable to 3D printing, prototyping and visualization are a perfect application. Feel free to watch a few YouTube videos and go out and buy a printer, or maybe build one of your own from scratch.

Ambarella to Present at the Deutsche Bank 2019 Auto Tech Conference December 10, 2019

SANTA CLARA, Calif., Nov. 15, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ambarella, Inc., (NASDAQ: AMBA), a leading developer of low-power and high-resolution human and computer vision solutions, today announced Fermi Wang, CEO, will be presenting at the Deutsche Bank 2019 Auto Tech Conference at the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco, on Tuesday, December 10, 2019.The “fireside chat” presentation is scheduled for 9:30 AM PST and will be webcast on the Investor events page of Ambarella’s website at http://investor.ambarella.com/events.cfm.  A replay will be available on the website for 90 days.About AmbarellaAmbarella’s products are used in a wide variety of human and computer vision applications, including  video security, advanced driver assistance (ADAS), electronic mirror, drive recorder, driver/cabin monitoring, autonomous driving, and other robotic applications.  Ambarella’s low-power and high-resolution video compression, image processing, and deep neural network processors and software enable cameras to become more intelligent by extracting valuable data from high-resolution video streams.  For more information, please visit www.ambarella.comContact:Louis GerhardyCorporate Development & Investor [email protected]

Article from: http://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2019/11/15/1948027/0/en/Ambarella-to-Present-at-the-Deutsche-Bank-2019-Auto-Tech-Conference-December-10-2019.html

How to design with the CLB

Introduction
To understand the CLB, this document examines each of its configurable blocks individually and explains how they can be used together. The CLB subsystem contains a number of identical tiles. There are four identical tiles in the F2837xD CLB subsystem, but other devices may contain more or fewer tiles. Each tile has the following:
4-input look-up table (LUT4) submodules
Counter submodules
Finite State Machine (FSM) submodules
Output 3-input lookup table (Output LUT) submodule
High-level Controller (HLC) submodule
A simple 4-state, state machine is designed. Each of the submodules in a CLB tile are used and their capability and example usage are shown.
Supplementary Online Information
For more information on the CLB module on a specific C2000 device, see the device-specific data sheet and the corresponding Technical Reference Manual (TRM).
This application report was written using the TMS320F2837xD family of devices. The data sheet and TRM used for this application report are listed below:
TMS320F2837xD Dual-core Delfino™ Microcontrollers Datasheet
TMS320F2837xD Dual-core Delfino™ Microcontrollers Technical Reference Manual
Additional support is provided by the TI E2E™ Community.
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Configurable logic block user's guide

Introduction
CLB Tool Outline
The CLB is a hardware module integrated into certain C2000™ devices. The CLB contains a set of configurable blocks and inter-connections which allows users to create their own custom digital logic along the lines of what could be done with a FPGA. For example, the CLB might be configured to enhance the functionality of existing device peripherals, or to create new peripheral functions. The CLB is configured using a software utility, referred to here as the “CLB tool”.
The CLB tool allows the user to configure and connect sub-modules in each CLB tile.
The tool makes use of the “SysConfig” graphical user interface (GUI) which is part of Code Composer Studio™ (CCS). The tool includes a small number of examples intended to help the user explore the features of the tool and to create their own projects.
The tool generates a C header file containing a set of constants corresponding to the configuration settings defined by the user in the GUI. The tool also generates a C source file which uses the constants in the C header file to initialize the CLB modules by loading the constants into the CLB registers by a sequence of register load operations. The functions in the C source file must be called during the device initialization. The tool does not configure the input and output connections between the CLB tile and other device peripherals, including the cross-bars and other CLB tiles. The configuration of these registers must be done separately and is the responsibility of the user.
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How to migrate from FPGA/CPLD to CLB

Introduction
Just like a CPLD or FPGA, CLB is composed of programmable logic primitives that can be configured in many ways to implement custom blocks of logic. Instead of using VHDL or Verilog to configure these logic primitives, CLB is programmed with a GUI-based SysConfig tool and function calls. Since the configuration method is different, the CLB is technically not a CPLD or FPGA, but it can be used to achieve identical results.
The CLB holds certain advantages over external CPLDs and FPGAs. Because it resides inside the C2000 device, CLB has direct access to key CPU and peripheral signals without having to account for pin delays. Additionally, a simple built-in HLC processor facilitates data transfer between CLB and C2000 memory allowing the CLB to work hand-in-hand with software running on the C2000 processor(s).
With CLB it is now possible to absorb external custom logic into the C2000 device, create custom peripherals inside the C2000, and modify existing C2000 control peripherals at input stage, output stage or at many pre-defined sites inside the peripheral. The following sections contain step-by-step instructions how to implement the most common use cases, plus low-level functional schematics of CLB building blocks to aid the process of mapping logic from VHDL or Verilog into CLB. Many powerful and flexible CLB features provide you with substantial benefits including reduction in system component count, added flexibility to differentiate products and ability to update custom logic in the field via software after parts have shipped.
This applications report is based on the base-level CLB architecture that is common to several C2000 devices including the F28004x, F2807x, F2837x, and F2838x series. Future versions will include additional features and expanded functionality.
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Alternative Replacement for EOL (Obsolete) Ceramic Capacitor of AVX, KEMET, TDK, MURATA, PANASONIC

Nov 14, 2019 (AB Digital via COMTEX) — In 2018, Murata announce quit production of leaded type ceramic capacitor market. In people’s imaging lead type ceramic capacitor is something represent to old fashion product, new fashionable product like Laptop, Smart phone, wireless phone charge, electrical car all using SMD type. This lead type ceramic capacitor still in need from special application, like high voltage machine, X-ray machine, Safety Certify, and application which required epoxy resin lead for better feasibility and strong protection of capacitor. So lead type ceramic capacitor will keep it place used in Industry field. Well know ceramic capacitor brand like AVX, KEMET, TDK, PANASONIC all stop most of their lead type capacitor line but end customer still seeking this Obsolete End of life item and want good replacement and alternative. HVC Capacitor is professional ceramic capacitor manufacturer, product range include:1) low and high voltage ceramic disc capacitor, lower to medium voltage (1kv to 6kv), high voltage means (10kv, 15kv and up)2) Safety Certify Ceramic capacitor, like Y1, Y2 Capacitor rated in 250VACac, 400vac.3) Radial lead type MLCC. Which using chip ceramic capacitor inside and with epoxy resin and soldering the lead. HVC Capacitor have rich experience for replacement Murata high voltage Ceramic Capacitor. radial MLCC and safety capacitor. Replacing ceramic capacitor is really challenge for design engineers. Many capacitor looks quite the same in shape but performance with hugh difference. For example, in X-ray, CT high voltage multiplier circuit. Using Murata’s DHR4E4C102K2FB (15KV 1000PF ZM) with good result but using other brand 15kv 1000pf always fail or even burn the capacitor.A perfect replacement should be:1) Using same class or better class dielectric material.2) Same or similar dimension of diameter and lead spacing.3) Rich application experience to select right component. Following is frequently search EOL ceramic capacitor by end user.1. AVX frequently search Obsolete /EOL item refer to some big diameter of radial mlcc and 3kv capacitor (small voltage), this is not popular brand for lead ceramic capacitor.2. Kemet frequently search model is 0.1uf radial mlcc in 50/100V, 0.1uf or we called “104 radial” is most popular use in Radial MLCC, almost 60% usage compare to other spec. 104 Radial MLCC mostly used in filtering purpose in hand hold equipment, metering device and mini motor application as smoothing noise.3. TDK frequently search Obsolete /EOL item we see is differences spec (1000pf, 2000pf, 4700pf) of y1/y2 capacitor in 440vac and 250VAC, TDK safety capacitor quite popular in DC-DC and DC-AC power supply and also widely use in Japanese brand white and black color home appliance. This is popular model and can replace by HVC’s safety capacitor.
Another popular TDK EOL ceramic capacitor is radial MLCC in 0.1uf, TDK lead type MLCC with a smaller lead than other brand, and very specialty, HVC may use special mold to build such kind small leg safety capacitor.4. Surprising that Panasonic EOL lead type ceramic capacitor still in popular search list. It refer to some 440vac safety caps and 1kv 2kv low voltage capacitor. Panasonic brand before very popular in world market for Japanese brand home appliance, especially TV, micro oven, but Panasonic already quit this market long time and in Japan and worldwide market, leading substitution is Murata. Now almost 40% market share is Murata ceramic capacitor.5. Murata EOL ceramic capacitor include quite big range: from smaller voltage 2kv, 3.15kv, 6.3kv full capacitance to high voltage 10kv to 15kv, because Murata have the biggest market share for lead type ceramic capacitor, and Murata just announce stop production, so there is still many end customer looking for replacement item to continue their existing running project. Welcome to inquiry to [email protected] to have corresponding alternative replacement item.

5ST472MCJCA

AVX 3KV 4700PF E D13

5WF104MEJAA

AVX 25V 0.1UF B D13

C320C104K1R5CA

KEMET 100V 0.1UF X7R P2.5

C320C104K5R5CA

KEMET 50V 0.1UF X7R P2.5

C322C104K1R5CA

KEMET 100V 0.1UF X7R P5

C322C104K5R5CA

KEMET 50V 0.1UF X7R P2.5

C330C104K1R5CA

KEMET 100V 0.1UF X7R P5

C330C105K5R5CA

KEMET 50V 1UF X7R P5

CD12-E2GA222MYGS

TDK 250VACAC 2200PF E D12

CD12-E2GA222MYNS

TDK 250VACAC 2200PF E D12

CD12ZU2GA472MYNKA

TDK 440VAC 4700PF E D13.5

CD16-E2GA472MYGS

TDK 250VACAC 4700PF E D15.5

CD16-E2GA472MYNS

TDK 250VACAC 4700PF E D15.5

CD70-B2GA101KYNS

TDK 250VACAC 100PF B D10

CD70ZU2GA102MYNKA

TDK 440VAC 1000PF E D7

CD85-E2GA102MYNS

TDK 250VACAC 1000PF E D8.5

CD90ZU2GA222MYNKA

TDK 440VAC 2200PF E D9.5

CD95-B2GA471KYNS

TDK 250VACAC 470PF B D9.5

CK45-R3DD102K-NRA

TDK 2KV 1000PF R D11

CS10-B2GA102KYNS

TDK 250VACAC 1000PF B D10

CS11-E2GA222MYNS

TDK 250VACAC 2200PF E D10.5

CS12-F2GA472MYNS

TDK 250VACAC 4700PF F D12

CS14-F2GA103MYNKA

TDK 440VAC 10000PF F D14.5

CS15-E2GA472MYNS

TDK 250VACAC 4700PF E D14.5

CS17-F2GA103MYNS

TDK 250VACAC 10000PF F D16.5

CS80ZU2GA222MYNKA

TDK 440VAC 2200PF E D8

D101G29C0GH63J5R

VISHAY 100V 100PF N D7.5

D101G29C0GH63L2R

VISHAY 100V 100PF N D7.5

DEA1X3D100JC1B

MURATA 2KV 10PF SL D4.5

DEA1X3D101JA2B

MURATA 2KV 100PF SL D7

DEA1X3D101JN2A

MURATA 2KV 100PF SL D7

DEA1X3D470JA2B

MURATA 2KV 47PF SL D6

DEA1X3D470JN2A

MURATA 2KV 47PF SL D6

DEA1X3F101JA3B

MURATA 3.15KV 100PF SL D9

DEA1X3F221JA3B

MURATA 3.15KV 220PF SL D12

DEBB33D101KC1B

MURATA 2KV 100PF B D4.5

DEBB33D101KP2A

MURATA 2KV 100PF B D4.5

DEBB33D102KA2B

MURATA 2KV 1000PF B D8

DEBB33D102KN2A

MURATA 2KV 1000PF B D8

DEBB33D221KC1B

MURATA 2KV 220PF B D4.5

DEBB33D221KP2A

MURATA 2KV 220PF B D4.5

DEBB33D222KA2B

MURATA 2KV 2200PF B D9

DEBB33D222KN2A

MURATA 2KV 2200PF B D10

DEBB33D471KA2B

MURATA 2KV 470PF B D6

DEBB33D471KN2A

MURATA 2KV 470PF B D6

DEBB33D472KA3B

MURATA 2KV 4700PF B D15

DEBB33D472KN7A

MURATA 2KV 4700PF B D15

DEBB33F101KCDB

MURATA 3.15KV 100PF B D5

DEBB33F102KA3B

MURATA 3.15KV 1000PF B D9

DEBB33F152KA3B

MURATA 3.15KV 1500PF B D11

DEBB33F221KCDB

MURATA 3.15KV 220PF B D5

DEBB33F222KA3B

MURATA 3.15KV 2200PF B D13

DEBB33F222KN3A

MURATA 3.15KV 2200PF B D13

DEBB33F332KA3B

MURATA 3.15KV 3300PF B D15

DEBB33F471KC3B

MURATA 3.15KV 470PF B D7

DEBE33D103ZA3B

MURATA 2KV 10000PF E D16

DEBE33D222ZA2B

MURATA 2KV 2200PF E D8

DEBE33F102ZC3B

MURATA 3.15KV 1000PF E D7

DEBE33F222ZA3B

MURATA 3.15KV 2200PF E D10

DEBE33F472ZA3B

MURATA 3.15KV 4700PF E D13

DEBE33F472ZN3A

MURATA 3.15KV 4700PF E D13

DEBF33D102ZC1B

MURATA 2KV 1000PF F D5

DEBF33D102ZP2A

MURATA 2KV 1000PF F D5

DEBF33D103ZA3B

MURATA 2KV 10000PF F D12

DEBF33D103ZB3B

MURATA 2KV 10000PF F D12

DEBF33D103ZN3A

MURATA 2KV 10000PF F D12

DEBF33D222ZA2B

MURATA 2KV 2200PF F D7

DEBF33D472ZA2B

MURATA 2KV 4700PF F D9

DEBF33D472ZN2A

MURATA 2KV 4700PF F D9

DEC1X3J050DC4BMS1    

MURATA 6.3KV 5PF N350 D7

DEC1X3J101JC4B

MURATA 6.3KV 100PF SL D13

DEC1X3J220JC4B

MURATA 6.3KV 22PF SL D9

DEC1X3J470JC4B

MURATA 6.3KV 47PF SL D9

DECB33J101KC4B

MURATA 6.3KV 100PF B D9

DECB33J102KC4B

MURATA 6.3KV 1000PF B D13

DECB33J221KC4B

MURATA 6.3KV 220PF B D9

DECB33J331KC4B

MURATA 6.3KV 330PF B D9

DECB33J471KC4B

MURATA 6.3KV 470PF B D10

DECE33J102ZC4B

MURATA 6.3KV 1000PF E D11

DECE33J222ZC4B

MURATA 6.3KV 2200PF E D15

DEHR33D102KA3B

MURATA 2KV 1000PF R D12

DEHR33D102KN3A

MURATA 2KV 1000PF R D12

DEHR33D221KC3B

MURATA 2KV 220PF R D7

DEHR33D222KA3B

MURATA 2KV 2200PF R D15

DEHR33D471KA3B

MURATA 2KV 470PF R D9

DEHR33D472KA4B

MURATA 2KV 4700PF R D21

DEHR33F102KA3B

MURATA 3.15KV 1000PF R D13

DEHR33F222KA3B

MURATA 3.15KV 2200PF R D17

DEHR33F272KA4B

MURATA 3.15KV 2700PF R D19

DEJE3E2102ZC3B

MURATA 250VACAC 1000PF E D7

DEJE3E2222ZA3B

MURATA 250VACAC 2200PF E D8

DEJF3E2103ZA3B

MURATA 250VACAC 10000PF E D11

ECK-A3A102KBP

PANASONIC 1KV 1000PF B D9

ECK-A3A103KBP

PANASONIC 1KV 10000PF B D22

ECK-A3D102KBP

PANASONIC 2KV 1000PF B D11

ECK-ANA102MB

PANASONIC 440VAC 1000PF B D10

ECK-ANA222ME

PANASONIC 440VAC 2200PF E D11

ECK-ANA472ME

PANASONIC 440VAC 4700PF E D16

ECK-ATS102ME

PANASONIC 440VAC 1000PF E D8

ECK-ATS103MF6

PANASONIC 440VAC 10000PF F D17

ECK-ATS222ME

PANASONIC 440VAC 2200PF E D9.5

ECK-D3A102KBP

PANASONIC 1KV 1000PF B D9

ECK-D3A103KBP

PANASONIC 1KV 10000PF B D22

ECK-D3D102KBP

PANASONIC 2KV 1000PF B D10

FK16C0G1H104J

TDK 50V 0.1UF C0G P2.5

FK18X7R1H104K

TDK 50V 0.1UF X7R P2.5

FK18Y5V1H104Z

TDK 50V 0.1UF Y5V P2.5

FK20C0G1H104J

TDK 50V 0.1UF C0G P5

FK20X7R1H105K

TDK 50V 1UF X7R P5

FK20X7S1H106K

TDK 50V X7S P5

FK22C0G2A104J

TDK 100V 0.1UF NP0 P5

FK22X7R1E106K

TDK 25V 10UF X7R P5

FK22X7R1H225K

TDK 50V 2.2UF X7R P5

FK22X7R2A105K

TDK 100V 1UF X7R P5

FK22X7R2E474K

TDK 250VAC 0.47UF X7R P5

FK22X7R2J104K

TDK 630V 0.1UF X7R P5

FK22Y5V1H106Z

TDK 50V 10UF F P5

FK24X7R1H105K

TDK 50V 1UF X7R P5

FK24Y5V1H105Z

TDK 50V 1UF Y5V P5

FK24Y5V1H474Z

TDK 50V 0.47UF Y5V P5

FK26X7R1E106K

TDK 25V 10UF X7R P5

FK26X7R1H474K

TDK 50V 0.47UF X7R P5

FK26X7R2A104K

TDK 100V 0.1UF X7R P5

FK26X7R2A105K

TDK 100V 1UF X7R P5

FK26X7R2E104K

TDK 250VAC 0.1UF X7R P5

FK28C0G1H101J

TDK 50V 100PF COG P5

FK28X7R1H103K

TDK 50V 10000PF X7R P5

FK28X7R1H104KN000

TDK 50V 0.1UF X7R P5

FK28Y5V1H104Z

TDK 50V 0.1UF Y5V P5

SK041E475ZAR

AVX 50V 4.7UF Z5U P5

SK051E685ZAR

AVX 100V 6.8UF Z5U P5

SK052E475ZAR

AVX 200V 4.7UF Z5U P10

SK055E106ZAR

AVX 50V 10UF Z5U P10

SK061E226ZAR

AVX 100V 22UF Z5U P20

WKO102MCPCJ0KR

VISHAY 440VAC 1000PF E D10

WKO222MCPCJ0KR

VISHAY 440VAC 2200PF E D13

WKO332MCPCJ0KR

VISHAY 440VAC 3300PF E D15

WKO472MCPEJ0KR

VISHAY 440VAC 4700PF E D18

 

 

DHRB34C102M2FB

MURATA 15KV 102M B

DHR4E4C102K2FB

MURATA 15KV 102K ZM

DHR4E4A221K2BB

MURATA 10KV 221K ZM

DHR4E4A331K2BB

MURATA 10KV 331K ZM

DHR4E4B102K2BB

MURATA 12KV 102K ZM

DHR4E4C101K2BB

MURATA 15KV 101K ZM

DHR4E4A102K2BB

MURATA 10KV 102K ZM

DHR4E4C221K2BB

MURATA 15KV 221K ZM

DHR4E4C471K2BB

MURATA 15KV 471K ZM

DHR4E4C681K2BB

MURATA 15KV 681K ZM

DHRB34A102M1FB

MURATA 10KV 102K B

DHRB34A102M2BB

MURATA 10KV 102M B

DHRB34A221M2BB

MURATA 10KV 221M B

DHRB34B471M2BB

MURATA 12KV 471K B

DHRB34C101M2BB

MURATA 15KV 101M B

DHR1X4D200K1HB

MURATA

DHRB34C221M2BB

MURATA 15KV 221M B

DHRB5AD102M1CB

MURATA 7.5KV 102M B

DHRE4AD222Z4QB

MURATA 7.5KV 222M E

DHS4E4F191MCXB

MURATA 30KV 191K N4700

DHS4E4F591MHXB

MURATA 30KV 591K N4700

 

 

DE1B3KX101KA4BN01F

MURATA CAP CER 100PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE1B3KX221KA4BN01F

MURATA CAP CER 220PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE1B3KX471KA4BN01F

MURATA 470PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE1E3KX102MA4BN01F

MURATA CAP CER 1000PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE1E3KX102MA4BP01F

MURATA CAP CER 1000PF 300VAC RADIAL

DE1E3KX102MB4BN01F

MURATA CAP CER 1000PF 250VAC RADIAL

DE1E3KX222MA4BL01

MURATA CAP CER 2200PF 250VAC RADIAL

DE1E3KX222MA4BN01F

MURATA CAP CER 2200PF 250VAC RADIAL

DE1E3KX222MA4BP01F

MURATA CAP CER 2200PF 300VAC RADIAL

DE1E3KX222MB4BL01

MURATA CAP CER 2200PF 250VAC RADIAL

DE1E3KX222MB4BN01F

MURATA CAP CER 2200PF 250VAC RADIAL

DE1E3KX332MA4BN01F

MURATA CAP CER 3300PF 250VAC RADIAL

DE1E3KX332MA5BA01

MURATA CAP CER 3300PF 250VAC RADIAL

DE1E3KX472MA4BN01F

MURATA CAP CER 4700PF 250VAC RADIAL

DE1E3KX472MA4BP01F

MURATA CAP CER 4700PF 300VAC RADIAL

DE1E3KX472MB4BN01F

MURATA CAP CER 4700PF 250VAC RADIAL

DE2B3KY221KA3BM02F

MURATA CAP CER 220PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE2B3KY471KA3BM02F

MURATA CAP CER 470PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE2E3KH332MA3B

MURATA CAP CER 3300PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE2E3KY102MA2BM01F

MURATA CAP CER 1000PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE2E3KY102MA2BM01F

MURATA CAP CER 1000PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE2E3KY102MA3BM02F

MURATA CAP CER 1000PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE2E3KY102MA3BM02F

MURATA CAP CER 1000PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE2E3KY102MA3BU02F

MURATA CAP CER 1000PF 300VAC RADIAL

DE2E3KY222MA2BM01F

MURATA CAP CER 2200PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE2E3KY222MA2BM01F

MURATA CAP CER 2200PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE2E3KY222MA3BM02F

MURATA CAP CER 2200PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE2E3KY222MB3BM02F

MURATA CAP CER 2200PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE2E3KY332MA3BM02F

MURATA CAP CER 3300PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE2E3KY472MA2BM01F

MURATA CAP CER 4700PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE2E3KY472MA3BM02F

MURATA CAP CER 4700PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE2E3KY472MB3BM02F

MURATA CAP CER 4700PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE2E3KY472MB3BU02F

MURATA CAP CER 4700PF 300VAC RADIAL

DE2F3KY103MA3BM02F

MURATA CAP CER 10000PF 250VACAC RADIAL

DE2F3KY103MA3BU02F

MURATA CAP CER 10000PF 300VAC RADIAL

DE2F3KY103MB3BM02F

MURATA CAP CER 10000PF 250VACAC RADIAL

 

 

For more information, visit: https://www.hv-caps.com/HV-Ceramic-Disc-Capacitor/hv-ceramic-disc-capacitor3339.html
Media ContactCompany Name: HVC Capacitor Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Contact Person: Danny ChenEmail: Send EmailPhone: +86 13689553728Address:9B2, Tianxiang Building, Tianan Cyber Park FutianCity: ShenzhenState: GDCountry: ChinaWebsite: www.hv-caps.com
COMTEX_356974497/2555/2019-11-14T20:43:03

SiC-Focused Eval Board Supports Motor Drives Up to 7.5 kW

Infineon Technologies AG’s new evaluation board, the EVAL-M5-E1B1245N-SiC, will help pave the way for silicon carbide (SiC) in motor drives, says the company. SiC is en route to mainstream for applications like photovoltaic (PV) and uninterruptable power supplies (UPS). Targeting the next group of applications for this wide-bandgap technology, Infineon claims to have developed the new evaluation board to support customers during their first steps in designing industrial drive applications with a maximum of 7.5-kW motor output.
The evaluation board features an EasyPACK 1B in Sixpack configuration with a 1200-V CoolSiC MOSFET (FS45MR12W1M1_B11) and a typical on-state resistance of 45 mΩ. It also has a three-phase ac connector, an electromagnetic-interference (EMI) filter, a rectifier, and a three-phase output for connecting the motor.
Based on the Modular Application Design Kit (MADK), the board is equipped with the Infineon standard M5 32-pin interface, which allows the connection to a control unit, such as the XMC DriveCard 4400 or 1300. Its input voltage covers 340 to 480 V ac.
The new member of the MADK family is optimized for general-purpose drives as well as for servo drives with very high frequency, says Infineon. The power stage contains sensing circuits for current and voltage; it’s equipped with all assembly elements for sensorless field-oriented control (FOC). The EVAL-M5-E1B1245N-SiC has a low inductive design, integrated NTC temperature sensors, and lead-free terminal plating, thus making it RoHS-compliant.
Infineon’s EVAL-M5-E1B1245N-SiC can be ordered now. More information is available here.